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The depth and breadth of Macquarie’s science

Last week the Faculty of Science held a conference to showcase the wide variety of Macquarie's scientific achievements.

“The purpose of this first conference is to bring together representatives from all research groups in the Faculty so staff can appreciate the diversity and quality of research,” explains Professor Stephen Thurgate, Executive Dean of the Faculty of Science.

“We have already established a network of high performance researchers. This is an opportunity for staff to discover chances to broaden their research connections across the Faculty.”

Approximately 360 academics and postgraduate students from a broad range of science disciplines including Earth Studies, Computer Sciences, Engineering, Mathematics and Biological Sciences registered for the full day event.

Research at Macquarie thrives on the University’s spirit of innovation.

Many of Macquarie’s successes in research have been due to its staff and student’s ability to be pioneers in their fields, and apply their findings to the needs of industry, society, and the environment.


"I chose Macquarie because of the excellence it has in biological sciences and in environmental management," says Professor Tim Flannery


    
Approximately 360 academics and postgraduate students from a broad range of science disciplines came together to share their research last week

One of Macquarie’s greatest environmental champions is Professor Tim Flannery, who gave the keynote address at the conference.

Professor Flannery is one of the world's leading writer/scientists and an internationally acclaimed explorer and environmentalist.

"I chose to work at Macquarie because of the excellence it has in biological sciences and in environmental management," says Professor Flannery.

He has written best-selling books on climate change, been an environmental adviser to the South Australian and federal governments, has discovered and named more than 30 new species of mammals (including two tree-kangaroos), discovered dinosaur fossils in Australia, and has taught at Harvard University.

“We need to look at the big picture. We need people who will examine how the atmosphere, oceans and rocks keep on shuffling and changing position. Issues like water security have become such critical survival matters for Australia and the world,” believes Professor Flannery.

Professor Flannery encourages future scientists, and thinks if students "have a natural curiosity about the world then give science a go. Whether you complete the degree or not, the experience will set you on a path of a lifelong journey of learning that will transform the way you see the
world."

For more information on the Faculty of Science, visit the website.

 

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